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Turkmen & Uzbek children's clothes

Until recently, traditional Central Asian clothing changed little or not at all. The ubiquitous outer robe (called chapan, khalat or don) was worn by by nomadic and settled people of all ages and both genders, and the most widely used fabrics were multi-colored handwoven stripes called bekasab or alacha. From the latter part of the 19th century onwards, inexpensive Russian cotton became very popular, while velvets and ikats were used by those who could afford them. Many were padded with cotton batting and lined with local handwoven cotton or brightly-patterned factory-produced fabric, much of it imported from Russian mills. The edges were commonly finished with decorative trimming that was intended to ward off evil spirits.

 

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Credits
Current Exhibitions
Alice Rekab
FAMILY LINES PROJECT

FAMILY LINES is a multi-platform project by artist Alice Rekab in collaboration with Éireann and I: A community archive for Black migrants in Ireland, and with contributions from Holly Graham, Salma Caller, Larry Achiampong, and Cypher Billboard, London. FAMILY LINES explores experiences of migration and survival within the family unit, and focuses on Black and Mixed-Race […]

David Lunney, Áine McBride & Katie Watchorn
From Here To There: Art in Process

From Here to There brings together artists David Lunney, Katie Watchorn and Áine McBride. Over six weeks, they will work onsite at The Douglas Hyde using the gallery as a studio; a space to think, build, experiment, and make new work. The project began on the 20th September with the artists’ arrival into the gallery, […]

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